A Capitol Fourth

Supporting Our TroopsSupporting Our Troops

Honoring Those Who Serve

Independence Day in the United States of America commemorates July 4, 1776, when the Continental Congress officially adopted the final version of the Declaration of Independence, our nation’s most cherished symbol of liberty.

Throughout our history, America’s sons and daughters have willingly laid down their lives to protect our nation and secure its freedoms. Today, we continue to rely on our all-volunteer forces. The greatness of our republic is founded in their selfless sacrifice. On the Fourth of July, and every day, we honor and remember their service to our nation.

When returning home from conflict, these brave men and women in the armed forces face a lot of challenges; living with the wounds of war, PTSD, securing jobs and, above all, finding their new mission as civilians. The transition from the front lines to the home front can be difficult, but there are many organizations that help to ease the burden of the military-to-civilian transition process. Find out how you can get involved and make a difference in a military family’s life today. 

The 2017 A Capitol Fourth will honor our military men and women with a tribute by country music star Trace Adkins, who will perform his new single “Still A Soldier.” This inspiring moment will be dedicated to our troops and veterans and all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice fighting for our freedom. Adkins’ song tells the story of a veteran who, though he is now living as a civilian, still feels the call to service.

This call to service leads veterans to continue the mission of service after their duty is done. For instance, after losing his twin brother to suicide and part of his own left leg to war, Retired National Guardsman Staff Sergeant Earl Granville found his new call to service: traveling the country offering counsel and encouragement to servicemen and women recently returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and experiencing PTSD. Hear Granville’s story and how he still serves in this video filmed before the 2017 National Memorial Day Concert.

Learn how you, too, can support those who have served and their families on our Support the Troops Resource page.

For those who’ve served, transitioning from the front lines to the home front can be difficult, but there are many ways veterans can continue to serve after their active duty is done. Hear the story of one veteran who has found his new mission.

This call to service leads veterans to continue the mission of service after their duty is done. One National Guardsman, Retired Staff Sergeant Earl Granville, after losing his twin brother to suicide and part of his left leg to war, found his new call to service as he travels the country offering counsel and encouragement to servicemen and women recently returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and experiencing PTSD. Hear Earl’s story and how he still serves in this video filmed before the 2017 National Memorial Day Concert.

Learn how you, too, can support those who have served and their families on our Support the Troops Resource page.

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